Travel Advice: Don’t Travel at Whitsun, 1943

Advice from the Railway Executive Committee advising customers not to  travel on Whitsun 1943 (which fell on Sunday 13th June), due to the trains being used to transport urgent supplies to the battlefront. Whitsun Trains are going to the front! We are on the eve of great events. Now – more than ever – every available train is needed for the massing of war materials for the battlefronts. Victory – and the lives of our men – depend on these supplies. DON’T TRAVEL AT WHITSUN Railway Executive Committee Source: Bromley…

Dainty Wear for Tiny Tots

Loving the names of the children’s clothing from this advert in the Bromley & District Times from May 1940. The Infant’s Art Spun Smock Art Crepe Romper Infant’s Dayella Gown Boy’s Cotton Buster Suit Girl’s Cotton Frock and Knicker Set All Wool Matinee Coat This shop also sold the classic Muslin Squares (still very much bought and used today) and of course Terry Squares – the forerunner to the modern day disposable nappy. Source: Bromley & District Times, 28th May 1943  (page 3)

Rowntree’s Cocoa: Advert from 1943

Rowntree’s is a British confectionery business founded at Castlegate, York by Henry Isaac Rowntree, when he purchased the already established Tukes’ cocoa and chocolate business. As a teetotal Quaker, he was able to add to the social side of the business: chocolate drinks were promoted as an alternative to alcohol for the working man. In 1869 he was joined in business by his brother Joseph, who developed Rowntree’s Elect Cocoa in 1887.  Marketed as ‘more than a drink, a food’, it proved extremely popular, resulting in the firm having to move to larger premises. Throughout much…

Put Some Beef into it

Torox Cubes was a lesser known beef bouillon brand made in England by Hugson & Co. Ltd. Manchester (“Manufacturers of “Atora’ Beef Suet). The story of Hugson & Co began in 1893 when Gabriel Hugon, a French engraver living in Manchester, noticed that his wife was having difficulty cutting-up blocks of suet in the kitchen. He saw an opportunity, and setup the first ever factory to manufacture shredded suet, in Manchester, UK.  Although ‘Atora’ was no doubt its most popular and well-known product (still available today), they no doubt attempted…

RAF “Presents” for Hitler

By the mid end of the Second War World, Britain began using larger ‘giant’ bombs against the enemy.  They were nicknamed the ‘blockbuster bomb’ by the press and referred to a bomb which had enough explosive power to destroy an entire street or large building through the effects of blast in conjunction with incendiary bombs. By informing the reader of the weapons being used upon the Germans during the Second World War, was this a form of propaganda to scare the enemy? This small feature appeared in the local newspaper in May 1943,…

What they Do and What they Wear: Lifebuoy Toilet Soap advert

Lifebuoy Toilet Soap was very much of a popular product being used during the Second World World.   It reached it peak during this period, before its popularity dwindled when rationing ended and more appealing products came to the market. We previously featured an advert for Lifebuoy from 1940, which featured a young boy and his granny: Lifebuoy Soap – Advert 1940 The Mechanised Transport Corps A khaki “British officer” tunic with a fleur-de-lis stamped on each button, royal blue piping round the cuff, title and crest worn on the right…

Swat that Squander Bug

The Squander Bug was propaganda character created during the Second War War by artist Phillip Boydell, an employee of the British National Savings Committee.  The unpleasant-looking character was used for press adverts, as well as widely used by other wartime artists in poster campaigns and political cartoons. At the time, the British National Savings Committee had become concerned that inflated prices were being paid for consumer goods that were in short supply and believed that the money would be better spent on savings certificates to help with the war effort.…

Daddy’s Medal: Devotion to Duty

This feature appeared in the Bromley & District Times calling for more to be done to save Daddy’s Medal… Our part in the Great Offensive doesn’t call for bravery, but it does call for devotion… Devotion to Duty.  No matter how hard we work, no matter how much we save, we cannot equal the sacrifice made by the men who use the weapons we provide… But we must try, so that at the end of it all we can say that “by devotion to duty” we, too, have played our…

Trailblazing iconic fashion of the 1940s

Although we look back at the 1940’s and think of it as a decade of mostly war and hardship, it was in fact a milestone decade for style in women’s fashion, despite the 1930’s being a hard act to follow. With style icons such as Christian Dior, Ava Gardner, Bette Davis, Doris Day and Rita Hayworth, these women were trailblazers in styles and new silhouettes – many styles of which are still supported today in women’s fashion. These adverts appeared in the local newspaper in 1943, encouraging women to invest…

House of Perrings

This featured appeared in the Bromley & District Times in 1941, giving a lovely introduction to the family firm Perring. A furniture company based on value and honesty. It was in 1892 that a new name came to the furniture trade of London when William Perring, a young man from the West Country, opened a small shop in Paddington. There was an ideal behind this venture – an ideal of service and value.  It was an ideal which found a ready response.  To-day you will find the name of Perring…