Entertainment

These articles give a fascinating insight into the various entertainments going on back in the UK during the First World War years.


Places of recreation for soldiers in 1917

A BROMLEY EFFORT We hear on all hands of the splendid work done by Army Huts at the Front, and how much they are appreciated by our men. But it is not only abroad that these huts are needed. In our own county of Kent alone are number of men, some engaged in guarding our shores, others still in training: men of the Royal Navy, men from all parts of the United Kingdom, men of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, the ...
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Soldiers Entertained

This extract, taken from the Bromley & District Times, 6th September, 1918 [pg 5] and gives an account of an evening of entertainment in Bromley: The men of the Army Service Corps in our neighbourhood, together with their lady friends, had a capital entertainment provided for them on Wednesday evening at the Drill Hall, Bromley, which well deserved the cheers given at the close. The principle part of the entertainment was sustained by the talent found in the men themselves, ...
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Pantomime time in Penge

Christmas and the New Year are traditionally pantomime times. On January 5th the Penge Empire were showing Little Red Riding Hood twice nightly at 6.10 and 11.30. The following week a musical comedy from the Prince of Wales Theatre in London was to be presented. In London Peggy Kurton played Evelyn. Whether she appeared at Penge is not known. To see pictures of the Penge Empire click here > ...
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“Dominion Day” at Orpington

Ontario Military Hospital Carnival It was “Dominion Day” at Orpington on the 1st inst., and a successful and largely attended sports carnival was held at the Ontario Military Hospital. There were probably more than 3, 000 persons present on the charming sports field above the hospital, situated in the very centre of a delightfully wooded and hilly country. While monoplanes and biplanes droned overhead, the sports programme was carried through with every evidence of pleasure to the many patients and ...
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Silent Films

On 9th February, 1917, the showing of the silent film, Davy Crockett was advertised; a magnificent drama in five parts. In those days the films were shown continuously on Saturdays from 2pm to 10.15 pm and two performances on other days. Seats: 3d (penny) + 1d leisure tax 4d (penny) + 1d tax 1 shilling (12 pennies) + 2d tax ...
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