Lieutenant J L Miller-Hallett

2nd Lieutenant J L Miller-Hallett (possibly John Lionel) was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs A Miller-Hallett of Goddington near Chelsfield, Orpington. He was a member of the Indian Army attached to the 3rd Fusilliers, and passed into the Indian Army at outbreak of war from Sandhurst College.  His brother, 2nd-Lieutenant J A Miller-Haller had obtained his commission in the 11th Battalion South Wales Borderers and was stationed at Colwyn Bay. J L Miller-Hallett was twice wounded in action on the Western Front. First in June 1915, when it was reported in the Bromley &…

Private Herbert Venters

Herbert Venters was the son of Mr & Mrs W Venters of Wharton Road, Bromley.  He had attended Wharton Road Council School. He was mentioned in the Bromley  & District Times onthe 25th Spetember 1914 as having joined up in the February and had volunteered for foreign service.  He became a member of the 5th Royal West Kent Regiment. He was reported as still serving in July 1917.   [source: www.militaryancestors.co.uk]

2nd-Lieutenant Cecil Henry Viney

Cecil Henry Viney was the son of Mr & Mrs C T Viney of Dartmouth, Durham Avenue, Bromley, who had been residents at South Hill Park for many years. His father was a Church warden at St Mark’s church, Bromley. Cecil was educated at South Lodge, Enfield Chase & Winchester. When war broke out he was a student at R.A. School of Painting. He was granted a commission in Aug 1914. Trained at Weymouth and attached to the 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment. On the 9th May 1915 he was in charge of 31…

2nd Lieutenant Ferdinand Marsham-Townshend

The younger son of the late Hon Robert Marsham-Townshend, of Frognal, Sidcup, Ferdinand Marsham-Townshend was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards. He died on the 16th May 1915, aged 35. At first he was missing, but his body was found and buried. Cut off with a party of Scots Guards he preferred death to surrender. His body was identified by a letter found on his person addressed to his mother. A Memorial Service was held at Christ Church, Down Street, W London. A description of the service and attendees is given…

Lieutenant Oswald Payne

Lieutenant (John) Oswald Payne was the son of Mr & Mrs Frederick Payne of New Farm, Bromley. Prior to the war, he was a junior partner in the firm of Baxter, Payne, and Lepper, (Bromley and Beckenham), and a Fellow of the Surveyors’ Institution and secretary of the Kent Branch of the Land Union. Payne joined the Artists’ Rifles immediately on the outbreak of war and was later granted a Lieutenant’s commission to the 4th Royal Warwickshires and later to the 1st Battalion. He was killed in action in April…

Warning to take your own Tea on Holiday with you

In 1918 the Ministry of Food proved it cared about its nations love of Tea after sending a message out to the public warning them that they may not be able to obtain supplies of their beloved brew whilst visiting holiday resorts, telling them to ‘take their own’ with them. Take Tea With You The Ministry of Food desires to warn visitors to holiday resorts that they must not rely on being able to obtain supplies of tea while away from home. Persons who do not propose to stay at…