Private Herbert Venters

Herbert Venters was the son of Mr & Mrs W Venters of Wharton Road, Bromley.  He had attended Wharton Road Council School. He was mentioned in the Bromley  & District Times onthe 25th Spetember 1914 as having joined up in the February and had volunteered for foreign service.  He became a member of the 5th Royal West Kent Regiment. He was reported as still serving in July 1917.   [source: www.militaryancestors.co.uk]

2nd-Lieutenant Cecil Henry Viney

Cecil Henry Viney was the son of Mr & Mrs C T Viney of Dartmouth, Durham Avenue, Bromley, who had been residents at South Hill Park for many years. His father was a Church warden at St Mark’s church, Bromley. Cecil was educated at South Lodge, Enfield Chase & Winchester. When war broke out he was a student at R.A. School of Painting. He was granted a commission in Aug 1914. Trained at Weymouth and attached to the 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment. On the 9th May 1915 he was in charge of 31…

2nd Lieutenant Ferdinand Marsham-Townshend

The younger son of the late Hon Robert Marsham-Townshend, of Frognal, Sidcup, Ferdinand Marsham-Townshend was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards. He died on the 16th May 1915, aged 35. At first he was missing, but his body was found and buried. Cut off with a party of Scots Guards he preferred death to surrender. His body was identified by a letter found on his person addressed to his mother. A Memorial Service was held at Christ Church, Down Street, W London. A description of the service and attendees is given…

Lieutenant Oswald Payne

Lieutenant (John) Oswald Payne was the son of Mr & Mrs Frederick Payne of New Farm, Bromley. Prior to the war, he was a junior partner in the firm of Baxter, Payne, and Lepper, (Bromley and Beckenham), and a Fellow of the Surveyors’ Institution and secretary of the Kent Branch of the Land Union. Payne joined the Artists’ Rifles immediately on the outbreak of war and was later granted a Lieutenant’s commission to the 4th Royal Warwickshires and later to the 1st Battalion. He was killed in action in April…

Warning to take your own Tea on Holiday with you

In 1918 the Ministry of Food proved it cared about its nations love of Tea after sending a message out to the public warning them that they may not be able to obtain supplies of their beloved brew whilst visiting holiday resorts, telling them to ‘take their own’ with them. Take Tea With You The Ministry of Food desires to warn visitors to holiday resorts that they must not rely on being able to obtain supplies of tea while away from home. Persons who do not propose to stay at…

Children to be paid to pick Blackberries

Blackberries – Children to get 3d. A lb for picking A discussion took place on the subject of blackberries for jam. The Kent Agricultural Committee wrote asking the Food Control Committee to appoint an organising agent for the borough to arrange and superintend the picking of blackberries by children and their conveyances to recognised jam manufacturers. Children would be paid 3d per lb. (pound) for all they picked, and the organising agent would be paid £3 per ton (imperial) for his services.  Tuppence for transport would be provided. In the…

Great Demonstration on the 4th Anniversary of the War, 1918

With the entry of the American troops, fresh and ready for the fight, in April, 1918 and the failure of the German Spring Offensive, the mood of the country becomes more optimistic for an end to the fighting. There was a celebration of the 4th Anniversary of the war on Martin’s Hall. These three men, The Mayor, Frederick Gillett; the Right Honourable H.W. Forster M.P.; and Sir Leonard Powell, all gave rousing speeches at the demonstration. It still needed three months until the Armistice was finally signed and the fighting…

Miss Beatrix Batten

It’s always nice to see women receiving awards for their efforts. Here we have Miss Beatrix Batten, Commandant of Abbey Lodge V.A.D. Hospital, Chislehurst awarded the M.B.E She was born in April 1886 and lived with her parents and sister at Foxdeane in Lower Camden, Chislehurst. Her father was a solicitor. Known as Trixie she graduated from Girton College, Cambridge. She volunteered with the Red Cross in 1913 and rose to become Area Commandant. She was awarded the Red Cross War Medal for over 1000 hours of unpaid work during…