Warning to take your own Tea on Holiday with you

In 1918 the Ministry of Food proved it cared about its nations love of Tea after sending a message out to the public warning them that they may not be able to obtain supplies of their beloved brew whilst visiting holiday resorts, telling them to ‘take their own’ with them. Take Tea With You The Ministry of Food desires to warn visitors to holiday resorts that they must not rely on being able to obtain supplies of tea while away from home. Persons who do not propose to stay at…

Children to be paid to pick Blackberries

Blackberries – Children to get 3d. A lb for picking A discussion took place on the subject of blackberries for jam. The Kent Agricultural Committee wrote asking the Food Control Committee to appoint an organising agent for the borough to arrange and superintend the picking of blackberries by children and their conveyances to recognised jam manufacturers. Children would be paid 3d per lb. (pound) for all they picked, and the organising agent would be paid £3 per ton (imperial) for his services.  Tuppence for transport would be provided. In the…

Great Demonstration on the 4th Anniversary of the War, 1918

With the entry of the American troops, fresh and ready for the fight, in April, 1918 and the failure of the German Spring Offensive, the mood of the country becomes more optimistic for an end to the fighting. There was a celebration of the 4th Anniversary of the war on Martin’s Hall. These three men, The Mayor, Frederick Gillett; the Right Honourable H.W. Forster M.P.; and Sir Leonard Powell, all gave rousing speeches at the demonstration. It still needed three months until the Armistice was finally signed and the fighting…

Miss Beatrix Batten

It’s always nice to see women receiving awards for their efforts. Here we have Miss Beatrix Batten, Commandant of Abbey Lodge V.A.D. Hospital, Chislehurst awarded the M.B.E She was born in April 1886 and lived with her parents and sister at Foxdeane in Lower Camden, Chislehurst. Her father was a solicitor. Known as Trixie she graduated from Girton College, Cambridge. She volunteered with the Red Cross in 1913 and rose to become Area Commandant. She was awarded the Red Cross War Medal for over 1000 hours of unpaid work during…

Playing Sports on the Front Line – August, 1918

Soldiers on the Front Line often took part in a variety of entertainment and sporting activities to keep up morale during the quiet periods of war.  One such letter, written to the Editor of the Bromley & District times in August 1918, provided an insight into one such event. Two members of the Royal Engineers, who were both local to the Bromley district, were reported as being the local competitors for one such sporting event.  Corporal J.B. Hopgood, an old member of Bromley Football Club, and Corporal W.E Copping of Bickley….

Boys Charged with Stealing Apples

The Bromley & District Times reported on a number of cases of boys stealing apples from Orchards on the Bromley borough area in the month of August 1918. Perhaps the apples were too good to resist, or the boys had a desperate need for food, who knows, but it seems they were willing to travel far from their homes to steal these crops from orchards in Chelsfield, Farnborough and St Mary Cray. There was a hefty fine for being caught at 15s each – at least 2 days wages for…

Is this the Ideal Summer Beverage?

Would an advert like this, as featured in the Bromley & District Times in July 1918, made you go out and buy Cyder to quench your thirst on these warm summer days? According to Minchew’s Real Cyder & Perry, there is a difference between Cider and Cyder. Cyder is rarely made on a commercial scale, whereas Cider is. Cyder is made from a single pressing of vintage fruit, rather like “extra virgin” olive oil. Cider, the drink almost given to agricultural labourers well into living memory, was made from the cyder pulp being re-pressed at the rate of 10…

Don’t run any risk with Allotment cuts & brusies – Use Zam-Buk

July 1918 The popularity of allotments at this time meant many could be liable to small scratches and cuts, which could quickly become infected and lead to severe consequences – after all- no antibiotics in 1918. An advert for Zam-Buk featured in the Bromley & District Times newspaper. Don’t run any risks with Allotment cuts & bruises Always carry Zam-Buk the antiseptic healer Work on the allotment produces a big crop of Cuts, Scratches and Blistered Hands, with the risk of dirt and dangerous disease germs infecting the broken skin…

Canadians & Americans bring their national game to Bromley

Ensuring that the oversea visitors felt at home, a game of Baseball was arrange at the Spartan Athletic Ground in Bromley between Canadian and American servicemen on the 6th July 1918. The event drew in a large crowd attracted to the sport with all proceeds raised divided between the Lewisham Prisoners of War Fund and the Canadian Convalescent Hospital. Canadians and Americans at Baseball A large number of people were attracted to the Spartan Athletic Ground, Bromley Hill, last Saturday, where Canadians and Americans met in their national game of…